Interviews with civil rights volunteers from the Medical Committee for Human Rights

Cover of: Interviews with civil rights volunteers from the Medical Committee for Human Rights |

Published by Microfilming Corp. of America in Glen Rock, N.J .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • Southern States.

Subjects:

  • African Americans -- Civil rights -- Southern States.

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementconducted during the summer of 1965 by the Stanford University radio station KZSU.
SeriesStanford University Project South oral history collection ;, no. 9, New York Times oral history program
ContributionsStanford University.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofiche 2479 (E)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 microfiche.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5202233M
ISBN 100884559823
LC Control Number75026688
OCLC/WorldCa12280675

Download Interviews with civil rights volunteers from the Medical Committee for Human Rights

The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in New York in the spring of as a support group for civil rights workers in Mississippi. That summer upwards of a thousand volunteers, most of them white northern college students, would travel to the Magnolia State to register voters, work in community centers, and teach in the new Freedom Schools [1].Author: John Dittmer.

Dittmer's chronicle of civil rights health care workers is captivating. All of us need to appreciate these brave pioneers. (Alvin F. Poussaint, MD, Harvard Medical School) The good doctors of John Dittmer's history of the Medical Committee for Human Rights labored at the crossroads of American medicine and American racism.

Forty years later the Cited by:   Medical Committee for Civil Rights at the March on Washington, National Library of Medicine #c Leonidas H. Berry, M.D.

was elected president of the National Medical Association (NMA) in Berry, a renowned gastroenterologist who spent much of his career at Provident Hospital in Chicago, had personally experienced discrimination. The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in the summer of by medical professionals, mostly white and Northern, to provide care and support for Civil Rights activists who were organizing black voters in Mississippi.

They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, to the March on Selma, 3/5(15). In the summer of medical professionals, mostly white and northern, organized the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) to provide care and support for civil rights activists organizing black voters in Mississippi.

They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, the March on Selma, and the Chicago 3/5(15). My new paper, Civil Rights and Shareholder Activism: SEC v.

Medical Committee for Human Rights, recounts the history of this litigation, which began in with the submission of a Rule 14a-8 shareholder proposal seeking to end Dow’s practice of manufacturing napalm.

It ended inwhen the Supreme Court declared the controversy moot. The Medical Committee for Human Rights. John Dittmer, PhD. The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in New York in the spring of as a support group for civil rights workers in Mississippi.

That summer upwards of a thousand volunteers, most of. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on Aug. 28,remembered primarily for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s “I Have a Dream” speech, was part of an era that forced the nation to become more fully aware of racial discrimination – including discrimination in health care, an achievement that in hindsight may be among the most significant of the movement for Civil Rights.

The Medical Committee for Human Rights was not the only organized effort at providing health care to protesters in the s. The Black Panther Party, founded inworked with the committee. Civil Rights Movement Archive Our Stories Submissions Policy. This section contains stories, oral histories, diaries, interviews, narratives, and remembrances about the author's experiences in the Freedom Movement.

In most cases these were written or told in later years. indicates that an audio version is also available on that page.

Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR), group of health care activists whose work in the late s and early s drew attention to inequities in health care in the United MCHR was a part of the larger civil rights movement in the United States. It was formed in the summer ofduring the so-called Freedom Summer (Mississippi Summer Project), a campaign to increase the.

Oral history interview with Peter Nash, white, male, student volunteer for medical committee for Human Rights, (side 1 Louisiana. Author: Nash, Peter Topic: Civil rights and Civil rights movements Language: English Physical Description: 1 audiotape and 1 transcript Publication Info: cau Genre: oral histories Collection.

In June the Medical Committee for Civil Rights members John Holloman, Robert Smith, and Walter Lear, shown here, protested outside of the American Medical Association's annual meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Courtesy Civil Rights Movement Veterans, The volunteers of the Medical Committee for Human Rights played a critical role in the Civil Rights Movement and, in particular, during Mississippi Freedom Summer of These MCHR volunteers, like all Civil Rights volunteers, put themselves at risk to fight for freedom and equality.

Phyllis Cunningham, R.N., a volunteer and staff member with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Medical Committee for Human Rights, discusses training federal inspectors on how to find civil rights violations in hospitals, and the treacherous ways in which some hospitals sought to deceive inspectors.

The Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) was a group of American health care professionals that initially organized in June to provide medical care for civil rights workers, community activists, and summer volunteers working in Mississippi during the "Freedom Summer" y associated with the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King, Jr.

notably addressed the MCHR. John Dittmer, The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care (New York: Bloomsbury Press, ). Interview with Dr. Robert Smith by Harriet Tanzman, April 8,Center for Oral History and.

In the summer of medical professionals, mostly white and northern, organized the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) to provide care and support for civil rights activists organizing black voters in Mississippi.

They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, the March. Book – Non-fiction. By John Dittmer. pages. This book explores the history of SNCC's Medical Committee for Human Rights, which was founded in to care for civil rights activists and later worked to make healthcare more accessible for disenfranchised communities.

Adopting the name the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR), the committee sent out a call for additional support. Roughly medical volunteers ultimately supported Freedom Summer volunteers, and the goals of the MCHR were to administer first aid to civil rights workers and local Black people, help people get access to doctors and.

Growing out of the Medical Committee for Civil Rights which organized the medical contingent of the March on Washington inthe Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) was formed in June of to support Freedom Summer. More than northern doctors, nurses, psychologists, and other health professionals, — Black and white — came.

When he went inside to answer the phone I browsed through a file of reports from field teams of the Medical Committee for Human Rights. I only had the stomach to read two of them. The first report described extended treatment given a young Negro civil rights worker for fifteen or twenty burns scattered all over his body.

Biography/History. The Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) was an organization of doctors, nurses, and other health care providers devoted to promoting civil rights, reaching out to minority groups, and improving the delivery of health services in the United States from to The Good Doctors describes a unique historical event in our ongoing struggles for civil rights and social justice: how hundreds of doctors, nurses, medical students, psychologists and other health professionals came to join Mississippi's 'Freedom Summer' in and served as a volunteer medical corps for the civil rights movement.

They went on. The first half of this book describes the early phase of the MCHR, from its founding in to The initial goal of the MCHR was to act as the medical arm of the civil rights movement, providing on-site medical support to civil rights workers during protests and fieldwork.

This book is a very well written and detailed look at the work that the Medical Committee for Human Rights did during the civil rights era. This is must read for those with an interest in social justice and/or medical history in the United States/5(18).

The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in to support civil rights activists during Mississippi's Freedom Summer. MCHR volunteers exposed racism within the American Medical Association, desegregated southern hospitals, set up free clinics in inner cities, and created the model for the community health center.

Posted 03/02/ John Dittmer’s new book, The Good Doctors Dr. Dittmer joined members of the Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement Project on Thursday, March 4, to discuss using oral history as a methodology for researching civil rights history, with particular attention to the work he did for The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human [ ].

As a Freedom Summer volunteer, many of the Freedom Summer and Civil Rights collections are related to the Kathleen Dahl Collection. Archive collections that relate directly to Kathy and her work with the Medical Committee of Human Rights and as a volunteer with the Holly Springs project are: M Civil Rights in the South Collection.

Southern Journey: A Return to the Civil Rights Movement. New York: Morrow, Dittmer, John. The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care.

New York: Bloomsbury Press, Eick, Gretchen. Dissent in Wichita: The Civil Rights Movement in the Midwest, Urbana: University. Formed inthe Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) was an interracial coalition of health professionals that deployed direct action confrontation and.

(Human Rights Watch World Report) Even though most developed nations have instituted laws intended to protect their populations from human rights abuses, millions of people across the globe continue to live under the threat of abuse and discrimination.

While it may seem like an overwhelming issue to tackle, there are still some small but. The Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) was created in to provide medical care to civil rights workers during Freedom Summer, the grass roots program that sought to register thousands of black Mississippians to vote.

Volunteer SMM IHRC is entitled to act as part of IHRC - Special Monitoring Mission International Human Rights Commission / SMM IHRC / programs, but has no right to represent and collect donations without separate authorization of the Headquarters - Czech Republic.

If you have any doubts or need additional information, please contact us at address e-mail: [email protected] Response to COVID Our staff will be working remotely until further notice but our main intake lines will remain open, and our staff can be reached through their regular email and phone lines.

CREATE TREATIES: An important function of human rights bodies is to expand our understanding of the scope and content of human rights. One way to do this is to oversee the drafting of new treaties.

For example, in andtwo new human rights treaties written by UN bodies entered into force: 1) the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and. Heather Booth (born Decem ) is an American civil rights activist, feminist, and political strategist who has been involved in activism for progressive causes.

During her student years, she was active in both the civil rights movement and feminist causes. Since then she has had a career involving feminism, community organization, and progressive politics.

The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in the summer of by medical professionals, mostly white and Northern, to provide care and support for Civil Rights activists who were organizing black voters in Mississippi.

They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from /5(18).

Appointed by the State Human Rights Committee for terms of from one to three years, the members are unpaid volunteers who perform certain oversight functions regarding facility and community programs and practices.

The committee also hears complaints that cannot be resolved at the program level. A personal interview is required of all. Medical Committee for Human Rights, Letter from Medical Committee for Human Rights to Margaret F.

Carroll, Janu From American Nurses Association Collection, Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center at Boston University; “ Mildred Pitts Walter oral history interview conducted by David P.

Cline in San Mateo, California, March. The Good Doctors examines the creation, role, activism, and struggles of the Medical Committee for Human Rights, which started as an organization to help civil rights workers in the South during the early s and grew to support civil rights advocates at protests and marches across the country.

As founder and national chairman for the Medical Committee for Human Rights, he led efforts to provide medical care to campaign volunteers, civil rights workers and anti-war protesters.The Ross Thalheimer Papers consist of papers relating to Thalheimer's activities as a civil rights supporter from the 's to the 's.

Files relate primarily to the funding and presentation of the Thalheimer Award to the National Urban League, including the prize winning essays written by students, and for the Thalheimer Awards he funded for the NAACP including information about the.

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